New paper in Communication Physics: A phase diagram for bacterial swarming

I’m happy to say that the paper “A phase diagram for bacterial swarming” has been published in Communication Physics (https://www.nature.com/articles/s42005-020-0327-1). This paper is the result of ancient long-running research (started in 2015…) and is joint work with Avraham Be’er, Bella Ilkanaiv, Daniel Kearns, Sebastian Heidenreich, Markus Bär and Gil Ariel. In it, we analyze how … More New paper in Communication Physics: A phase diagram for bacterial swarming

New paper on arXiv: Concentration on the Boolean hypercube via pathwise stochastic analysis

I’m happy to say that my advisor Ronen Eldan and I somewhat recently uploaded a paper to the arXiv under the title “Concentration on the Boolean hypercube via pathwise stochastic analysis” (https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.12067), wherein we prove inequalities on the Boolean hypercube using a cool continuous-time random process. In the previous post, I pretended that I had … More New paper on arXiv: Concentration on the Boolean hypercube via pathwise stochastic analysis

Catastrophic cubic crash course

I’m happy to say that my advisor Ronen Eldan and I somewhat recently uploaded a paper to the arXiv under the title “Concentration on the Boolean hypercube via pathwise stochastic analysis” (https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.12067), wherein we prove inequalities on the Boolean hypercube using a cool continuous-time random process. That’s quite a mouthful, I know, and quite unfortunately, … More Catastrophic cubic crash course

Descent into madness

This post is about the basics of the “gradient descent” method for finding the minimum of a function. I started writing it mainly to review the optimization material of lectures by Sébastien Bubeck given in Seattle. All of the material can be found elsewhere (for example, Sébastien’s book), but I can assure you that in … More Descent into madness

Few courses are better

At the end of the semester, in order to see their grades, students at the Weizmann Institute must complete an online survey about each course they participated in. The survey asks questions about both the course and the teachers, and the results are then shown in a “previously, on ‘Topics in Holomorphy’ ”-styled section in … More Few courses are better

Electric Insanity

My piano is mentally ill. Now, you might be wondering how it is that a piano can be sick, but it’s an electronic piano (Korg SP250), and thus has a specialized electronic brain in charge of imitating the sound of tiny hammers hitting strings when I press its plastic keyboard. And like any brain, it … More Electric Insanity

Skin and bits

My wife and I have a problem. Well, I mean, not a problem, per se. We are “of divided opinions”. She wants to have a baby. I want to program. The two are obviously incompatible. And it’s not that she doesn’t like to program, she loves it very much, coding away her will and command; … More Skin and bits

The many faces of Mona Lisa

Or: fooling around with image processing kernels. Original greyscale: Edge fit + bw cutoff: Partition into multiple bw images and taking Laplacians: Plain Laplacian + bw cutoff: High frequency removal by partitioning into multiple bw images: Sexy dark high frequency removal: Subtracting low frequencies from original image: Overshooting Laplace central element (does this filter make … More The many faces of Mona Lisa

Programming complex transformations

Facebook should change their “It’s complicated” status to “It’s complex”. That way, real people with imaginary girlfriends could spread the news to all their friends! – Ancient proverb We were learning about conformal maps in complex function theory. While we did plenty of “circles are sent to circles” and “connected components are sent to connected … More Programming complex transformations

Do not track

“Home is where the wifi connects automatically”. The question remains to be asked, how does it know to connect automatically? Well, of course, the computer saves a list of network names (or other identifiers) and their passwords, and tries to connect when it sees one it recognizes. I bet the passwords are saved in plaintext, … More Do not track

Zero knowledge in the real world?

[Written under the influence of QCSD] Not so long ago, I happened to watch the totally-accurate-in-every-possible-way film, “Travelling Salesman”. tl;dw: a squad of government-hired mathematicians are finally able to prove that P = NP, giving the state the power to answer every important computational question they can imagine (aka rob banks and fight terrorism). But … More Zero knowledge in the real world?