New paper in Communication Physics: A phase diagram for bacterial swarming

I’m happy to say that the paper “A phase diagram for bacterial swarming” has been published in Communication Physics (https://www.nature.com/articles/s42005-020-0327-1). This paper is the result of ancient long-running research (started in 2015…) and is joint work with Avraham Be’er, Bella Ilkanaiv, Daniel Kearns, Sebastian Heidenreich, Markus Bär and Gil Ariel. In it, we analyze how … More New paper in Communication Physics: A phase diagram for bacterial swarming

New paper on arXiv: Decomposition of mean-field Gibbs distributions into product measures

I’m happy to say that my advisor Ronen Eldan and I recently uploaded a paper to the arXiv under the title “Decomposition of mean-fields Gibbs distributions into product measures” (https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.05859). This is a sister paper of the previous one about exponential random graphs: this one presents a “general framework” and only briefly touches on how … More New paper on arXiv: Decomposition of mean-field Gibbs distributions into product measures

A singlet’s lament

Valentine’s day is upon us. A poem. Hebrew follows English. When I see your wavefunction collapse into the arms of another man, I feel all my eigenvalues degenerate to zero. You seem so happy together; happier with every measurement, like he is a ladder operator and you, so much more than a good number, are … More A singlet’s lament

There are no zeros in physics

I recently read an article by Joseph Ford: “How random is a coin toss?” (1983). In it, Ford talks about the relation between completely deterministic systems and the seemingly random behaviour they sometimes produce. “Roulette wheel spins, dice throws […] are universally presumed to be completely random despite their obvious underlying determinism. Weather, human behavior … More There are no zeros in physics

I am The Harmonic

List of courses for which I’ve had to solve (for class, assignments, or tests) simple, damped, and driven harmonic oscillators: Physics 1: The student encounters this recurrent and relentless creature for the first time. Physics 2: Now with electricity! Physics lab 1: First chance you actually get to see it in real spacetime. Still have … More I am The Harmonic

Unfathomable

Sometimes, people ask me why I study physics. Lately I’ve been asking myself that as well, especially with respect to my future studies. Then again, sometimes, when I read a book or walk about in the garden, I happen to accidentally look at my arm and HOLY SHIT MY HAND IS MADE OF 1026 PROTONS … More Unfathomable

Small Facebook Groups are Shaped by Strong Leaders

Not long ago, I started studying for my undergraduate degree in mathematics and physics at the Technion. This by itself is a good prospect, but in the process I also found myself added to various Facebook groups related to the studies. Looking at a particularly small one (11 members), I noticed that most of the … More Small Facebook Groups are Shaped by Strong Leaders

How Dense?

In the last post I talked about the physics and considerations behind the gravity train. A crucial part of the calculations involves the average Earth density. This is what determines the period, or how fast the train will go. It also determines the pressure our tunnel must sustain, and the amount of work we must … More How Dense?

Grav Train

We all love flying: it’s both an exhilarating experience and a fast way of getting from place to place. But jet planes are gas guzzling beasts and produce immense amounts of CO2. Plus, it can take an entire day to fly around the globe; way too long for impatient businessmen. Here I would like to … More Grav Train