New paper on arXiv: A conformal Skorokhod embedding

I’m happy to say that I recently uploaded a paper to the arXiv under the title “A conformal Skorokhod embedding” (https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.00852). In this post, I’d like to explain what the Skorokhod embedding problem is, how I came across it, some previously known solutions, and my own tiny contribution. But really, all of this is just … More New paper on arXiv: A conformal Skorokhod embedding

Random graphs: The exponential random graph model

Some mathematicians like probability, and some mathematicians like graphs, so it’s only natural that some mathematicians like probabilistic graphs. That is, they like to generate graphs at random, and then ask all sorts of questions about them: What are the features of a random graph? Will it be connected? Will it contain many triangles? Will … More Random graphs: The exponential random graph model

Random graphs: The Erdős–Rényi G(n,p) model

Some mathematicians like probability, and some mathematicians like graphs, so it’s only natural that some mathematicians like probabilistic graphs. That is, they like to generate graphs at random, and then ask all sorts of questions about them: What are the features of a random graph? Will it be connected? Will it contain many triangles? Will … More Random graphs: The Erdős–Rényi G(n,p) model

There are no zeros in physics

I recently read an article by Joseph Ford: “How random is a coin toss?” (1983). In it, Ford talks about the relation between completely deterministic systems and the seemingly random behaviour they sometimes produce. “Roulette wheel spins, dice throws […] are universally presumed to be completely random despite their obvious underlying determinism. Weather, human behavior … More There are no zeros in physics